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Recent Posts

My recent family loss, and introducing Borrow.ly, my next adventure

4 minute read , Posted on May 30, 2014, by Carl V. Lewis

In the long-overdue 7 months since I last posted here, I’ve gone through one of the most difficult situations of my life – one which I’m not seeking your sympathy for, and also not embarrassed to admit the depression the loss brought on.  I’ll leave all that stuff to Tumblr for you to read should you wish

So long, Savannah, and a new entrepreneurial path

5 minute read , Posted on November 10, 2013, by Carl V. Lewis

This week, I put in my two weeks’ notice at Savannah’s Morning News Media and our parent company, Morris Publishing Group, to move back after the holiday to New York City to join an up-and-coming NYC-based startup. In my year-and-a-half at the helm of the SMN’s digital content and product development strategies, including launching dosavannah.com, I learned invaluable management skills, conflict resolution and the courage to push fearlessly for innovation, even when tradition and red...

“Newspapers are the new startups”

1 minute read , Posted on July 09, 2013, by Carl V. Lewis

Newspapers are the new startups . . . we’re starting to see a lot of great changes as technologies improve and cultures change.” -John Levitt, Director of Sales and Marketing,  Parse.ly

What we can learn about charts from The WSJ Guide to Information Graphics

12 minute read , Posted on July 13, 2012, by Carl V. Lewis

Although geared primarily toward the production of static graphics for print publications, Dona M. Wong’s The Wall Street Journal Guide to Information Graphics (2010) provides a wealth of salient and time-honored tips and guidelines that any student of data visualization would be well-advised to follow. At the heart of Wong’s book is the notion that data integrity trumps all else, and no matter how aesthetically pleasing or visually powerful an information graphic may be, if it doesn’t communicate clear...

Making the case for hover interactions in maps

19 minute read , Posted on July 12, 2012, by Carl V. Lewis

In keeping with my recent spate of mapping nerdiness, I decided to take an interactive map I produced last month displaying statewide annual population changes a step further by adding mouseover/hover capabilities. Here’s the hover-y, nicely-colored chloropleth map I came up with. But before I get into the nitty-gritty of how I created the map –– which I’ll explain step-by-step in a later post –– let me exercise a bit of self-indulgence by defending my...

Overlaying a bubble chart onto a Google map

25 minute read , Posted on May 04, 2012, by Carl V. Lewis

Others may hate, but I’m a big fan of using bubbles to display data. When implemented correctly (i.e. scaled in terms of area instead of diameter), bubbles can be an aesthetically appealing and concise way to represent the value of data points in an inherently visual format. Bubbles are even more useful when they include interactivity, with events like mouseover and zoom allowing users to drill down and compare similar-sized bubbles more easily than they...

Why calculus matters when it comes to data-driven stories

7 minute read , Posted on April 17, 2012, by Carl V. Lewis

A quick refresher from my data visualization professor here at Columbia a couple of weeks ago reminded me why I was forced to spend all those grueling hours calculating standard deviation back in high school.

What makes BostonGlobe.com “the world’s best designed website”

16 minute read , Posted on April 16, 2012, by Carl V. Lewis

With the Pulitzer Price announcements coming up later this afternoon, you’d think I’d be writing about whose up for the “Best Deadline Reporting” or “Best Public Service Journalism” prizes. But instead I want to talk about a different media award doled out during the past week: BostonGlobe.com’s designation as the “world’s best designed website” by the Society for News Design. Put simply, I can’t say I disagree.